Tag Archives: Sacred Heart University Alumni

The Rundown on 2017 Tax Reform in Luxembourg from SHU Alum Frédéric Scholtus (MBA ’12)

What Individuals Can Expect from Proposed 2017 Luxembourg Tax Reforms

Le coin des Big 4 / Les grandes lignes de la réforme fiscale 2017 pour les personnes physiques- LE JEUDI- OCTOBRE 6, 2016

Frédéric Scholtus
Frédéric Scholtus, Associate Partner, in charge of Global Mobility Services in the tax department, KPMG Luxembourg

Pour l’impôt des personnes physiques, cela se matérialise entre autres par une nouvelle répartition des tranches de revenus imposables, la refonte des crédits d’impôt et l’introduction de nouveaux taux d’imposition qui impacteront le porte-monnaie des ménages en 2017.

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Plagiarism In The Digital World

By David G. Taylor, Ph.D.

Today, it is easier than ever before to commit plagiarism, and the lines are as to what constitutes plagiarism have grown fuzzier and hazier. As a result, even marketers who consider themselves ethically constrained may cross those lines.

As a university professor, fighting student plagiarism is a battle as old as my profession, but today it is even more difficult. Students can copy and paste entire documents with a few keystrokes. But plagiarism has also become more difficult to define. Our university handbook defines plagiarism as “misrepresenting the sources of one’s information and ideas” or “presenting another person’s written words or ideas as one’s own.”

In the age of social media and content aggregation, this notion seems almost quaint. Content sharing and assimilation is an integral part of the social media environment, and millennials have grown up in this world. But it’s not unique to the younger set. When any of us connected consumers find something that catches our fancy, we “like”, “retweet” or “share” it. It’s the social part of social media.

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Marketers are no different. There is a world of content out there, and we want to share it with our customers, or highlight information that support our messages. It’s a vital part of maintaining our presence in digital and social media. But it’s easy to slip into questionable acts of plagiarism. How many times have I needed an image for a PowerPoint presentation, and simply copied and pasted from Google? More than I’m willing to admit.

The format in which Google returns search image results, in particular, makes the process of plagiarism seem more innocuous. We receive a page of images disconnected from their source, and a simple right-click makes it our own. Similarly, it’s a short leap from using text as source material to just copying it outright. With all of the sharing going on, it can also be difficult to cite original sources, even if we want to. For example, in researching this article, I found an info-graphic that claimed that the level of plagiarism on the Internet could exceed 63%. I found no source for this statistic, despite URLs listed as sources, so I am not going to cite it as fact, tempting as it may be. I will simply say that this claim exists on the Internet.

As a marketer, there are steps you can take to avoid becoming part of the significant percentage of Internet content (whatever that percentage may be) that is plagiarized:

Don’t use Google image search as a content tool.

Just don’t do it. Subscribe to a royalty-free stock image service such as ShutterStock instead.

Use hyperlinks to refer readers to the original source.

It is unlikely the content owner will complain if you cite a short snippet of their text and drive traffic to their site. (If you’re reading this and want to share it on your website, feel free. Just link this page.)

When retweeting or otherwise sharing posts, be sure the original source appears prominently.

If you’re sharing an industry report, attribute whatever you say to the organization that created it.

Avoid retweeting images or graphics.

Unless you have explicit permission to share, or the image appears in your Facebook feed when you share a link to a page, use text and hyperlink to the image. (And, of course, credit the source.)

Don’t copy and paste text.  

Unless you are planning to directly quote text, don’t copy and paste it into a new document.  It’s a commonly used shortcut – copy, paste, then change the copied text to paraphrase – but too often the last step is either insufficiently original, simply overwriting a word here or there, or skipped altogether.  Rather than copying and pasting the original text, type the paraphrased section on the new document in your own words (and, of course, be sure to attribute the source material.)

David G. Taylor, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Marketing at Sacred Heart University.  Dr. Taylor has more than 12 years of experience in the interactive marketing industry, and his research into online branding, social media and digital marketing has appeared in top academic journals.  

From Brazil to Luxembourg – From Student/Intern to Full-Time Employee

In August 2015 Gabriel Ristow Cidral traveled all the way from Brazil to join the SHU Luxembourg Welch MBA with internship program. Soon after his arrival he started his internship at PwC Luxembourg. Like any other student Gabriel worked long and hard hours to get the most out of his intern experience at PwC.

His hard-work paid off.

SHU is proud to report, in less than one year after starting his internship, and even before graduating, Gabriel has earned a full-time position as a Market Analyst at PwC.

SHU asked Gabriel about his experience as a SHU student and as an intern:

How did you find the life as a student in Luxembourg?
How do you feel being offered a full-time job before graduating?
Your journey from intern to full-time employee…
How did the MBA help to build your career?

Here’s what he had to say…

And we are proud again!

Congratulations to Roland Junck, MBA, Class of ’95 and Marcello Bergamo, MBA, Class of 2013.

Roland Junck, MBA, Class of ’95

SHU alumnus and steel industry veteran, Roland Junck, MBA ’95, has been appointed as the as the new Chairman of the Board of British Steel.

“Roland Junck began his career in Arbed and now plans a future in British Steel” Photo by Luxembourger Wort, Chris Karaba

The referendum on United Kingdom membership of the European Union does not make things easier, but perhaps more interesting.

READ FULL ARTICLE on WORT.LU

 

Over recent weeks I have visited many of our sites and have been very impressed by the drive and determination of our employees as they continue to take the business forward. While everyone is aware of the challenges the steel industry faces, British Steel already has a strong business plan in place.

READ FULL ARTICLE on FT

Marcello Bergamo, MBA, Class of 2013

Gold Medalist and Valedictorian of the Jack Welch College of Business graduating class of 2013, Marcello Bergamo, has been appointed as the General Manager Europe at Ampacet Corporation.

MBergamo
Marcello Bergamo

 

 

 

 

 

About Ampacet

Founded in 1937, Ampacet is a privately held company that produces masterbatches and employs over 2000 people. It operates 24 manufacturing sites in 17 countries.

 

BREXIT: Now What?

What’s your outlook for the future of Europe post-Brexit? Catch a glimpse of what participants shared at the SHU Lunchbox Debate

SHULA, Students and Faculty Celebrate the End of the Academic Year!

It was an evening of reunions—with drinks in hand and stories to share—as 50+ SHU alumni, students and faculty came out to celebrate at the End of the Academic Year Party hosted by the SHULA, Thursday, June 30 at Jakob’s House.

SHULA exclusively reserved the 1st floor of Jakob’s for the event; offering an excellent setting for networking, discussion and exchange—it provided the relaxed evening atmosphere of Clausen, while ever so slightly removed, so as not to put a strain on the conversation. Better still, the football match was on just outside so no one had to miss the game.